Sunday, July 26, 2009

Myers Briggs Type Discussion: The Four Functions


This post is continued from the previous article,
Myers Briggs Type Discussion: The Four Attitudes.
If you haven’t read that yet, you should also give it a look.

The Functions

There are two kinds of functions in Myers Briggs theory: ones that help you perceive the world around you (the perceiving functions: Intuition or Sensation) and ones that help you make decisions based on the info you have perceived (the judging functions: Thinking or Feeling).

The Perceiving Functions: Intuition vs. Sensation

Intuits and Sensors

The people that have a Perceptive attitude towards life (also called P-types: ISTP, ESFP, INTP, ENFP, etc.) use one of these two functions as extroverted (Ne or Se): this is the way they prefer to deal with their external environment. Extroverted P-types (ExxP) use it as their primary function, and Introverted P-types (IxxP) use it as secondary.

The Judging types (J-types: ESTJ, ENTJ, INFJ, ISFJ, etc.) will use one of these functions for dealing with their own inner world, as an introverted function (Ni or Si). Extroverted J-types (ExxJ) will use it as secondary and Introverted J-type (IxxJ) will use it as primary.

Your preferred perceiving function indicates how you tend to take in new data and what sort of information you naturally focus on.

Intuitive people are focused on meaning and relationships between elements, rather than the elements themselves. Their thinking is more abstract and they tend to know things without being able to explain how they came to know them: they connect information non-linearly, and take leaps with their imagination.

Intuits are anticipating: they take in all the available data in a global way and instantaneously find the pattern and follow it to its next step. They know what will come, based on what it currently is – and this is what makes them so talented at predicting trends, outcomes and the future in general.

The Intuitive people are imaginative, playful and insightful. They are attracted to possibilities, alternatives and have a strong fascination with the unknown and unseen. For this reason, some people (Sensors) might consider them odd or bizzare – and this is partially true: Intuits are in love with the bizzare, the hidden and everything that’s out of common and that can only be accessed through the imagination.

Overly focused on the general, the global and their own hunches about what’s really going on behind what they physically perceive, Intuits can lose sight of the details and miss the trees for the forrest. Their original views, creative analogies and unexpected insights can lead them to innovative discoveries but can also make them more absent and impractical.

They can encounter difficulties in managing everyday matters such as money, jobs, bills and food – physical realities and routine bore them tremendously so they find it hard to stick with such commitments. Their attention is always caught by whatever is new and exciting so they might find it hard to entertain a steady long-term interest in something or someone (this happens more with Extroverts than with Introverts). Responsibility and perseverance are tough challenges for them.

Sensation types are completely different: they’re practical, realistic and very down-to-earth. The function of Sensation focuses on reality as we perceive it through our 5 senses, in the here-and-now - what we hear, see, smell, touch and taste – and so these people are far more aware of their physical bodies and the pleasure they can obtain through them: they are more sensual people, and thus seek sensual stimulation and input such as good food, relaxing massages or manual work. They love to consume and possess material things: money, food, housing – everything that’s palpable and durable is of great interest and importance to them.

Sensors are also detail-oriented and strikingly observant. Intuits might get lost in their mental worlds and constructs but this rarely happens to Sensation types: they’re grounded, real and vigilant. Their thinking is linear, sequential and factual – they rarely miss logical order in favour of more fancy approaches. Pragmatic and precise, they have a knack for dealing with details and skillfully using their hands and bodies.

Sensation types are also literal people, who mean what they say and rarely make use of metaphors and between-the-lines messages (that they sometimes also miss in casual conversations). They prefer particulars to generals and rely on past experience to deal with their current problems – they tend not to trust theories and alternatives that have not been proved or that seem too abstract (and therefore unreliable).

Their concrete, empirical approach provides them with stability and objective clarity, but can also give them trouble with grasping abstract theories and notions which they cannot apply to their own experience. Also, the focus on precise data and factual specifics can make them miss the forrest for the trees and lose sight of the bigger picture, the wider context around them: they find it hard to see things in perspective or see them from a different point of view. This can make them more conventional, limited and solely concerned with material values (to Intuits).

By deciding whether you are an Intuit (N) or a Sensor (S), you will also figure the second letter in you Myers Briggs type: S or N.


The Judging Functions: Thinking vs. Feeling

Thinking and Feeling

The preferred Judging function reveals the way we use the information available to make judgements, take decisions and put our life in order so as to obtain more control over it.

Judging types rely on one of these functions in their dealings with the outside world – it is therefore used as Extroverted (Te or Fe, according to choice). It will serve as the primary function for Extraverted J-types (ESxJ and ENxJ) or as the secondary function for Introverted J-types (ISxJ and INxJ).

Perceiving types use their Judging function to deal with their inner worlds (as Introverted: Ti or Fi). It will be the main function for Introverted P-types (ISxP and INxP) or the secondary function for Extroverted P-types (ESxP and ENxP).

Thinking types are inclined to make decisions impersonally, by use of logic, principles and general laws. They extensively work with definitions and categorize situations, people and ideas by objective criteria that has little to do with personal preference or ideals. This way, Thinking types detach themselves from what they are observing and analysing, relying on general rules and logical order (such as hyerarchy, numerical sequence and cause/effect) to help them with their decision process.

Because of this, Thinking people appear to be colder and emotionally reserved. They focus on efficiency and are able to assess people and situations objectively and realistically, according to their goals. Because they have a strong interest in how things work, they’re usually able to figure out the underlying principles on which things (and people) are based and employ them skillfully to obtain a specific effect: they make great engineers, psychologists, mathematicians and scientists in general.

Thinking types are attracted to systems and categories and use them in order to create a sort of mental blueprint of their environment and their own thoughts as well. These frameworks offer them a reliable tool for predicting and tackling complex and difficult problems: they can break them down to their basic structure and solve them elegantly.

These types analyze information in terms of cause and effect and are generally extremely intellectual. Although they have feelings and personal preferences, they do not include them in their decisions. The values they hold are also impartial: fair-play, justice, intellectual freedom and individual rights are strong principles that they ascribe to.

Thinking people are easy to spot by their interest in structure, order, categories, logical consistency and systems and by their analytical coolness. They are sometimes intellectually arrogant, tend to dismiss their feelings and the feelings of others and hide their emotions from the world. The impersonal way in which they apply their principles and judgements can sometimes appear dispassionate and even cruel to a more emotional type (Feeling). They apparent coldness and cynicism can raise difficult issues in their personal and intimate relationships.

Feeling types are just the opposite: instead of logical order and principles, they focus on human needs and social relationships. They are warm, empathetic persons who prefer to make decisions based on personal values such as harmony, love, kindness, people’s feelings and mercy.

Feeling people are interested in other people’s emotional needs and can anticipate and fulfill these with amazing accuracy. They succesfully employ body language and vocal intonation in order to align themsevles with other people’s feelings and moods - this is why they can also become poweful manipulators who know how to obtain strong emotional reactions from their audience.

They are obviously people-oriented types, empathetic and compassionate towards others and usually in search of social consensus and shared values. They strive for harmony, and because their dislike for conflict is quite considerable, they are willing to compromise in order to obtain it. They abhor fights and arguments and are usually the first to push for reconciling after a conflict.

Their decision process is mostly based on how they feel about a situation, and how other people would feel if a certain option were to be chosen. They are afraid to hurt others so they will try to please everyone or as many people as they can. This doesn’t mean that Feeling types cannot be very logical and intellectual on many occasions – it simply means that as long as the logical way contravenes with their inner values and ethics, it will not be used by them, even if they will acknowledge its potentially higher efficiency.

They also tend to categorize the world in terms of ‘good and bad’, ‘nice and ugly’ according to how much they like or dislike a certain aspect. Whoever they meet and whatever they discover – they will relate it to themselves in a personal manner (either by accepting or rejecting it) and their feelings will usually show. They find it hard to keep neutral and detached.

Feeling types are idealistic, merciful and sensitive towards others. They have rich emotional and spiritual experiences and are not afraid to explore their feelings and share them with the world. Sometimes the care they have for others can lead them to judgement errors and exaggerated social displays. They can have trouble putting their foot down and taking the unpopular decision, even when it is the case: they’re painfully aware of how they could let loved ones down. Feeling type can at times appear too sentimental and illogical (especially to Thinking types).

By choosing your judging function between Thinking and Feeling, you'll also discover the third letter of your Myers Briggs type: T or F.


Next, read about the Cognitive Functions in Myers Briggs Types (soon)




Thursday, July 23, 2009

Myers Briggs Type Discussion: The Four Attitudes


I was thinking, I never got the chance to talk about the theory that underlies the Myers Briggs typology (which is further based upon Jung’s personality types). So in the next few posts I will talk about what the letters in the Myers Briggs type stand for and how you can discern your type by using the four dichotomies: Introversion vs. Extroversion, Intuiting vs. Sensing, Thinking vs. Feeling and Judging vs. Perceiving.

As most of you probably know, the Myers Briggs type is an acronym that indicates our preference in each dichotomy.

The first and fourth letters indicate your preferred attitudes, while the two letters in the middle indicate your preferred functions.

The Attitudes

There are two kinds of attitudes: the one you have towards the outer world (an introverted attitude or an extroverted attitude), and the one that you have towards making decisions in the outer world (a perceptive attitude or a judging attitude).

The Introverted vs Extroverted Attitude (I/E)

Introverts and Extroverts

Introverts tend to focus much more on their inner worlds. They define themselves through their private thoughts and feelings and can appear disengaged with their environments. They try to adjust outer reality to their own subjective views about it and not vice-versa – this means that to a large extent, they will not associate who they are to what is around them and they will not allow their environment to affect them too much.

Due to this inward focus, Introverts are generally more withdrawn, quiet, less sociable and more original and eccentric in their minds. They have a few friends with which develop more intense and deeper relationships. They can concentrate better and easily ignore distractions when they’re focusing on something but at the same time they might be subjective in their conclusions because they tend to resist outer reality and feel separated from it.

Introverts reflect more before they act and are usually more abstract and insightful than Extroverts. They have less energy to spare and try to conserve it by interacting less: too much stimulation can quickly overwhelm them so they need to withdraw again in order to rest and recover their energy.

Introverts get energized by being alone. That doesn’t necessarily mean they are unsocial people or that they can’t be a wonderful company (especially with close ones), but it does mean that Introverts will need more privacy, silence and time to reflect than Extroverts ever will. They are more reserved because they hold their energy in to preserve it, but this reclusive attitude also sometimes causes them to feel quite self-aware, shy and a bit socially awkward.

Extroverts are very different: they define themselves through their environment and love to interact with it all the time. They get bored when they’re alone for too long because what energizes them is being out there with people and lots of things to do. They have a sensibly higher amount of energy and like to spend it: the more they do, the more alive they feel.

They usually have large groups of friends and acquaintances, even though most of these relationships are rather superficial and based on temporary common interests. They’re also louder, more sociable, friendlier and more assertive than Introverts: they speak their minds and sometimes even speak without thinking first. Extroverts tend to be more expressive and approach people and situations fearlessly.

An interesting thing about them is their tendency to describe themselves through their environment (their friends, their possessions, their favorite color, their political party etc.). They let their environment influence them and while they can be very adaptable, they can also become unaware of their own needs. While Introverts try to adapt their environment to themselves, by choosing from it only what suits their views, the Extroverts do the exact opposite: they adapt themselves to their environment and form their thoughts and feelings based on it. This is what makes them more popular and why Extroverts seem (and really are) more socially tuned and often more objective.

By deciding whether you are an Introvert or an Extrovert, you will obtain the first letter of your type acronym: I or E.

This will also tell you whether your dominant function will be Introverted or Extroverted.


The Judging vs Perceiving Attitude (J/P)

Judgers and Perceivers

These two attitudes indicate the way we tend to handle decisions and which kind of function - a judging or a perceiving one - we will use to deal with the external world (will be Extroverted).

The Judging function will be either a T (Thinking) or F (Feeling) and the Perceiving function will be S (Sensing) or N (Intuiting) – in both cases depending on our specific preference.

Judging types like to make decisions and stick with them: they use an extroverted Judging function (Te or Fe). They generally dislike open-ended, ambiguous situations and so they are punctual, stable, orderly and respect deadlines. They usually finish whatever they start and like to plan their activities in advance, sometimes by using schedules and tables: they like things to be settled.

Judging types usually keep their environments clean and orderly. They keep their commitments, are reliable, organized and steady and generally they are hard-working people with an inclination to assume authority and control other people and situations.

Sometimes, problems may arise with their difficulty to be flexible and accept change as a natural part of life: they tend to be more rigid and unwilling to compromise. Judging types also have trouble with unpredictable situations, feeling unprepared and tending to freeze in front of the unexpected – they often lack in spontaneity and that’s why they push to know everything in advance.

The Perceivers are their opposite: they’re rather spontaneous, carefree and adaptable. They love change and variety and don’t mind uncertain situations as much – they can deal with them easily, by improvising and finding ingenious solutions on the spot.

Perceiving types are flexible, open-ended, curious, unstructured and impetuous – they are using an extroverted Perceiving function (either Ne or Se) . They don’t bother much with rules and deadlines, and they’re the kind of people that postpone engagements until the last possible moment. They work best under a bit of pressure and tend to finish projects past their due time (if at all).

Perceivers like to have tons of information before they make a decision, so this is one reason why they’re never sure of what they should do: what if something better comes up? Therefore they’re slow to make decisions and even when they do, they are bound to change them and forget about their previous commitments.

Their main problems stem from being flighty and undecided, not managing to finish most things they start, being unpredictable and unreliable (which causes problems with people around them) and sometimes acting recklessly and on impulse.

By deciding whether you are a Judger or a Perceiver, you will obtain the fourth (and last) letter of your type acronym: J or P.

This will also tell you whether your extroverted function will be a Judging one (T or F) or a Perceiving one (N or S).

Next, read about Myers Briggs Type Discussion: The Four Functions




Wednesday, July 22, 2009

The Enneagram Tritype


ThreeThe concept of the Enneagram Tritype has recently caught my attention as another great way of explaining subtle but surprising differences among individuals of the same type, and also a wonderful way of expanding and diversifying the description of personality. This idea originally belonged to Oscar Ichazo, and was afterwards studied and further developed by Katherine and David Fauvre.

What is the tritype?

Theory says that we do not make use of only one single Enneagram type, but of actually three of them – one in each triad: the Heart Triad (2,3,4), the Head Triad (5,6,7) and the Gut Triad (8,9,1). This means we have a preferred coping strategy in each Centre and our personality is thus tridimensional to an extent.

While we basically use our main type (and main Centre) the most, we will occasionally employ different strategies and coping methods belonging to the other two types (and Centres) in our tritype. The order in which we engage these and their prevalence in our thoughts and behavior will decide the order in which they appear in the tritype.

For example if someone's main type is 7 (in the Head triad), but they also identify quite a lot with a 2 (from the Heart centre) and sometimes with a 9 (in the Gut triad), then their tritype will probably be 7-2-9. However, remember that in the tritype you can't have two types belonging to the same triad (you cannot be a 5-6-8 or a 2-5-3).

How can I determine my tritype?

In order to proceed with determining your tritype, you have to first be very sure about what your basic type is, and which instinctual variant is dominant in your case (knowing your instinctual stacking would be best). Only after these two aspects of your personality are very clear to you, you can move on to assess and discover your tritype. Otherwise it would be pointless - tritype cannot be established if we don't know our main type, and if we take a guess, it won't do us much good or help us in many ways.

Tritype can be achieved through self-observation and sometimes through testing (although the first method is more reliable). It's practically the same way you did with your basic type.

Think about which type you tend to identify with more in the Heart Centre, then in the Thinking Centre and finally the Gut Centre – observe yourself for a longer period of time and don't be in a hurry. Read as much as you can about each type so you are clear about what makes them different. Try to get it right and be certain when you choose. Also notice to what extent these three types can be found in your personality and order them according to that (from the most prevalent - the basic type, to the least manifest - the third).

It often happens that we make sensibly less use of one of the Centres and deciding on our preferred type in that particular Triad can be quite challenging: all three types seem so foreign to us or at least so undifferentiated that we can't make a proper assessment. Time can be a good ally in finally deciding, so give yourself plenty of it.

Sometimes, because personality is very dynamic and continuously changing, it is possible that the last two types in the tritype could change or fluctuate in intensity over long periods of time. This is more likely to happen with the third one, which is less often employed. But it is just as possible that they will become more pronounced and better defined, shedding more light on an initially ambiguous typing.

You can also use Enneagram tests to help you figure out or confirm your tritype – a simple free test that shows you the scores for all 9 types is good enough. You can easily see which type in each triad has a higher score. You can also estimate what is the order in which you use each Centre, by adding the scores of the belonging types and comparing the sums.

There is as well a special test that will determine your tritype. It costs 10$ and I think it is well worth the try: The Enneacards Test.

How is the tritype helpful?

The tritype is very helpful when it comes to explaining differences between people belonging to the same Enneagram type: it broadens our understanding of the Enneastyle archetypes and it reduces stereotyping. It helps us understand more about our personality and that of others and it allows for finer distinctions within each type.

For example, a friendlier, more personable 5-2-9 will be notceably different from a rather temperamental 5-8-4 and they both will be quite different from a more rigid and practical 5-1-3. They are all still basically 5s, but it's the little things that set them all a bit apart. The same stands true for the rest of the types as well.

Each person is not only differentiated by their main type (9 possibilities), their wing (9x2=18 possibilities), their dominant instinctual variant (18x3=54), the stacking of the instinctual variants (54x2=108), but also their preferred types in each Centre – the tritype (108x18=1,944 possibilities).

1,944 different kinds of people – this is hardly stereotyping.

In a future article, I will also try to briefly describe each tritype in light of the particular flavour it gives to the main type.

Tritype Descriptions
Tritypes for type One
Tritypes for type Five




Sunday, July 12, 2009

Enneagram and Myers Briggs Type Correlations


Although it was never possible to exclusively assign different Myers Briggs types to certain Enneagram points, extensive research has proven that a statistically significant correlation does exist between the two typologies.

Different studies provided somewhat different data, however there are many similarities among the results, so I will focus on these particular correlations that remain valid in a large number of cases.

The following table reflects the reseach results of many studies and theories (revealed to us by different experts such as John Fudjack, Patricia Dinkelaker, Don Riso, Richard Hudson, Elisabeth Wagele and others), but also my personal vision on the matter, based on my own theories.

I put the MB types in order of their prevalence in each Enneazone, from left to right for each frequency group (the meaning of 'often', 'sometimes' and 'rarely' is explained at the end of the table).


Enneagram TypeJungian FunctionsMB Types
OneExtraverted Thinking
Extraverted Feeling
Often*: ISTJ, ENFJ, ENTJ, ISFJ, INFJ, ESTJ, INTJ
Sometimes**: ISTP, ESFJ, ESTP, INFP
Rarely***: INTP, ENFP, ENTP, ISFP, ESFP
TwoExtraverted Feeling
Introverted Feeling
Often: ESFJ, ENFJ, ESFP, ENFP, ISFJ, ISFP
Sometimes: INFJ, INFP, ISTP
Rarely: ENTP, INTP, INTJ, ENTJ, ESTP, ESTJ, ISTJ
ThreeExtraverted Thinking
Extraverted Feeling
Often: ENTP, ESFJ, ESTJ, ENTJ, ENFJ ESTP, ENFP
Sometimes: ISFJ, INFJ, INTJ
Rarely: ISTJ, INFP, ESFP, ISFP, INTP, ISTP
FourIntroverted Intuition
Introverted Feeling
Often: INFJ, INFP, ISFP, ENFP
Sometimes: ENFJ, INTJ, ESFP, ISFJ
Rarely: ISTJ, ENTP, ESFJ, ENTJ, INTP, ISTP, ESTP, ESTJ
FiveIntroverted Thinking
Introverted Intuition
Often: INTP, INTJ, ISTP, INFJ, ISTJ
Sometimes: INFP, ISFP, ENTJ
Rarely: ESTJ, ENTP, ENFP, ENFJ, ESFJ, ISFJ, ESTP, ESFP
SixIntroverted Sensation
...and most other functions
Often: ISTJ, ESTJ, INFP, ISFJ, ESFJ, ENFP, INTP
Sometimes: ISFP, ISTP, INTJ, INFJ, ENFJ, ENTJ
Rarely: ESTP, ESFP, ENTP
SevenExtraverted Intuition
Extraverted Sensation
Often: ESFP, ENFP, ESTP, ISTP, ENTP
Sometimes: ENFJ, ENTJ, INTP, ISFJ
Rarely: INTJ, INFJ, INFP, ISFP, ESFJ, ESTJ, ISTJ
EightExtraverted Thinking
Extraverted Sensation
Often: ENTJ, ESTJ, ESTP, ESFP, ENTP, ENFP
Sometimes: IISTJ, INTJ, ESFJ, ISFJ
Rarely: ENFJ, INFP, INFJ, ISFP, INTP, ISTP
NineIntroverted Feeling
Introverted Sensation
Often: ISFP, INFP, ISTP, ESTP, ISFJ
Sometimes: ESTJ, ISTJ, ENTP, ESFJ, ENFJ, INFJ, INTP
Rarely: ENFP, INTJ, ENTJ, ESFP

*Often means there is a probability of 70-79% for that Enneagram type to also score as one of the listed MB types

**Sometimes means there is a probability of 18-27% for that Enneagram type to also score as one of the listed MB types

***Rarely means there is a probability of less than 4% for that Enneagram type to also score as one of the listed MB types


I think it's important to remember that these associations are not set in stone, therefore there is no rule in what concerns the relationships between the two typologies. There are INTPs who are Fours, INFPs who are Ones or Eights, ESTJs who are Twos and all sorts of seemingly unlikely combinations. They are rare, but nonetheless they do exist. It's what makes the human personality so diverse and fascinating – you can never really nail it down to a stereotype and it will always find ways to surprise you whenever you try to label it or box it.

These correlation tables can be very useful when you're having some trouble deciding your type - let's say you know your Enneagram point to be 8 and you can't decide between ESFJ and ESTJ: according to statistics, the odds are that you're probably an ESTJ. This doesn't mean it's 100% certain that you are, but that there are higher chances. That's what statistics can do for us.

Here is a table with statistical survey data, first presented in an article by Andrea Isaacs and John Fudjack in the 'Enneagram Monthly', in March 1996.

Click to see full-size

This second table indicates the calculated i-values(density) for each type correlation. It is based on the data from the previous table:

Click to see full-size

And finally, the following chart provides some interesting hypotheses on the possible Jungian prototypes for each Enneazone and it's based on the i-values table.

Enneagram TypeJungian Prototype
1TJ
2EF
3ET
4IN
5IT
6SJ
7EN
8ET
9IF


In a future article, I will also discuss 'type misfits' – people who don't seem to act their type, people who are hard to label or categorize, and also strange combinations such as ESTP Twos or INFJ Sevens.




Friday, July 10, 2009

Enneagram Misidentifications - Type 8


In this article, I will try to clear up some of the differences between Enneagram Type Eight and the rest of the Enneagram types respectively. The comparison tables will be subject to modifications and additions as more information reveals itself.

I hope it will be a useful tool for people who have trouble mistyping or aren't sure of their type - I'm one of them too.

8 and 1

Mistyping frequency: often (generally 1s mistype as 8s)

Eight
"My way"
Impose
Focus on power
Visceral
Subjective
Concern for “their people”
Proud of their anger
Revenge
Physical
Openly aggressive
Expansive
Crude
Informal
One
The right way
Convince
Focus on morality
Abstract
Objective
Concern for humanity
Ashamed of their anger
Moral justice
Cerebral
Moderated
Reserved
Refined
Formal



8 and 2

Mistyping frequency: sometimes (usually 2 men mistype as 8s)

Eight
Dominate for power
Open conflict
Show anger
Direct speaking
Intimidate
Tough
Self-focused
Want authority
Two
Dominate to help
Manipulation
Hide anger
Indirect hints
Dramatize
Vulnerable
Others-focused
Want appreciation


8 and 3

Mistyping frequency: sometimes (usually 3s mistype as 8s).

Eight
Material & sexual dominance
Seek power
Control
Stirred by failure
Forceful
Become intimidating
Combative
Unconcerned with image
Crude
Defiant
Three
Social status
Seek validation
Prestige
Scared of failure
Adaptable
Become devious
Competitive
Concerned with image
Smooth
Well-mannered


8 and 4

Mistyping frequency: rarely (sx 4s can resemble 8s).

Eight
Tough
Pragmatic
Strong
Take action
Self-confident
Repress emotions
Practical
Rather coarse
Four
Soft
Melancholic
Vulnerable
Indulge in fantasy
Self-loathing
Express emotions
Impractical
Refined


8 and 5

Mistyping frequency: rarely (between self-confident 5s and intellectual 8s)

Eight
Confrontational
Instinctual
Act
Pragmatic
Demand of life
Feel powerful
Grounded
Expansive
Poweful presence
Insensitive
Overwhelming
Aggressive
Five
Withdrawn
Cerebral
Prepare
Impractical
Retreat from life
Feel powerless
Abstract
Restrained
Somewhat absent
Sensitive
Overwhelmed
Reserved


8 and 6

Mistyping frequency: sometimes (usually couterphobic 6s think they are 8s)

Eight
Strategic
Powerful
Willful
Certain
Self-assured
Offer protection
Pressure others
Lucid anger
Consistent
Resist
Grounded
Forceful
Six
Reactive
Anxious
Unsure
Ambivalent
Self-doubting
Need protection
Feel pressured
Irrational outbreaks
Contradictory
Give in
Volatile
Hesitant


8 and 7

Mistyping frequency: sometimes (usually 7w8 mistype as 8s)

Eight
Seek intensity
Want control
Physical energy
Hard-working
Focused
Conscientious
Realist
Gain power
Authoritarian
Vengeful
Seven
Seek variety
Want freedom
Nervous energy
Playful
Scattered
Irresponsible
Optimist
Have fun
Egalitarian
Tolerant


8 and 9

Mistyping frequency: rarely (8w9 can resemble 9w8 ).

Eight
Assertive
Aggressive
Impose
Start conflict
Engaged
Controlling
Direct
Show anger
Want intensity
Powerful
Nine
Self-effacing
Peaceful
Compromise
Avoid conflict
Disengaged
Easy-going
Mediate
Deny anger
Want routine
Soft